Category Archives: Behaviour / Motivation

Saving time, money, and a whole lot of hassle when ordering games, activities, and equipment for playtimes

When a member of staff approaches you and asks for authorisation to order something, and a different member of staff approaches you the very next day for authorisation to order a similar thing – I can imagine that to describe it as “frustrating” would be an understatement.

For not only could these “things” have been ordered from the same supplier, which would have saved on both time and paperwork, but the school could have saved on the delivery costs and, in many cases, taken advantage of a bulk or wholesale discount.

And so it is for this reason that we are making you aware of our Bumper Playground Pack – so that instead of ordering different playtime games, activities, and equipment from different suppliers, you can get everything you might need from Edventure – www.edventure.co.uk.

By ordering everything in one go with our Bumper Playground Pack you will save £35.05 (14%), and this does not include the savings that you can make on delivery – which is free, by the way, if you quote HH0515 at the time of order.

The Bumper Playground Pack comes complete with 2D Boules, Ankle Skip, Big Hand Tennis, Catchtails, Cats Cradle, Diabolos, Flipsticks, Foam Flyers, French Skipping, Hoop a Peg, Koosh Balls, Lolo Balls, Mini Footballs, Plastic Stilts, Poly Playground Balls, a Scoop Set, a Shuttleball, Skipping Ropes, Soft Wall Balls, Spinning Plates, a Springy Ball Game, a Starball, Twirling Ribbons, and Whopper Hoppers.

Furthermore, we have also produced a number of free downloadable Game Guides, including Guide to Starball and a Guide to Spinning Plates, so your lunchtime supervisors can be confident in introducing new games to your pupils.

More free downloadable Game Guides can be found to accompany our playtime games, activities, and equipment at www.edventure.co.uk.

As always, you can place an order with Edventure in a variety of ways, including:

  • on the website www.edventure.co.uk/
  • by faxing us to 01323 50 10 41
  • by calling us on 01323 50 10 40
  • by emailing us at sales@edventure.co.uk
  • by post to Edventure Ltd, Hargreaves Business Park, Hargreaves Road, Eastbourne, East Sussex, BN23 6QW

In 20 years ADHD has moved from an American myth to a recognised issue but the debate still rages as to what to do.

According to the Care Quality Commission last year, there has been a 50% rise in England in the use of drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in six years. The watchdog warned health workers to “carefully monitor” their use as they have the potential to be “abused”.

As the consultant psychiatrist Professor Tim Kendall, said, “I think it’s a real trend. I think it’s too big to be ignored.”

Tim Kendall is certainly someone whose comments are worth considering since he compiled the national guidelines on treating ADHD, and he was one of the first people who pointed out that that there are real dangers to people who take ADHD drugs over a long period.

As he said, “I think there’s also increasing evidence that it precipitates self-harming behaviour in children and in the long term we have absolutely no evidence that the use of of Ritalin reduces the long-term problems associated with ADHD.”

Helping ADHD pupils and students through school is a volume that sets out in great detail exactly how ADHD students can be helped and supported in their day to day activities within the school without the use of drugs.

A fundamental view of the book is that the best approach for any ADHD child is one in which the parents and school can work together with a common purpose to help the young person – and with this in mind there is a substantial section of material at the end of the book that can be copied and passed on to parents.

This parental section contains both explanations and practical approaches to dealing with the ADHD child at home.

Of course, we all recognise that not every ADHD child’s parents will be able to work in the organised and controlled manner that will help ADHD students, and therefore we work within the school-based sections from the basis that although parental support is ideal it doesn’t always happen.

The book looks at individual behaviour, plus issues such as rewards, punishments, handling special days when behaviour may be exacerbated, overcoming impulsiveness, homework, where ADHD people can succeed and do well, ADHD and responsibility, and sport, the arts and other activities.

Helping ADHD pupils and students through school by Tony Attwood is available as a photocopiable book or on CD Rom which can itself be copied or loaded onto the school’s learning platform or intranet.

ISBN: 978 1 86083 855 2 Order code: T1789emn – please quote with order.

Sample pages can be viewed at http://pdf.firstandbest.co.uk/attentiondeficit/T1789.pdf

  • Photocopiable report in a ring binder, £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • CD with school-wide rights: £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • Both the Ring Binder and the CD £31.94 plus £3.95 delivery
  • Prices include VAT.

You can purchase the report…

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Mental Health Issues and Syndromes – Raising Staff Awareness

A national campaign on teenage mental health has just been launched to stop students stigmatising peers who suffer from mental illness and to help parents identify the symptoms of mental health. A new national survey of 10,000 youngsters aged 2-19 and their families, to identify the mental health issues that are most common, is now being undertaken. The results of this survey are not due until 2018 and resultant improvements in services would not take place until then. So therefore it is important that in schools we keep up to date with the latest key ways we can identify and support students with mental health issues and the 3 volumes of Behaviour Solutions – A Guide to Syndromes and Conditions will be a valuable photocopiable resource to support staff in their work. All 3 volumes cover the full range of mental health difficulties listed in the Social, Emotional and Mental Health Difficulties section of the SEN Code of Practice.

Each volume gives a guide to a wide range of conditions (there are 68 in all) and looks at definitions, symptoms and characteristics, causes, treatments, strategies to use in the classroom and a list of useful references including websites.

Volume 1, (A Revised Guide to Syndromes and Conditions), focuses on 20 conditions including Autism, Asperger Syndrome, ADHD, Conduct and Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Tourette’s Syndrome, OCD, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Dyslexia. It contains latest research findings, 3 new conditions as well as updated information on conditions relating to the recently published DSM5.

Volume 2, (A Guide to More Syndromes and Conditions), moves on to 26 conditions and issues not covered in the first volume including Anxiety Disorder, Depression, Eating Disorders, Loss Separation and Bereavement, Mental Health, Self-Harm, Substance Misuse and Cerebral Palsy.

Volume 3, (A Guide to Further Syndromes and Conditions), moves on to 22 conditions and issues not covered in the first two volumes including Selective Mutism, Joint Hypermobility, Bipolar Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder and Apraxia.

One particular benefit is that the books come in a photocopiable format so that if you wish to circulate details of a condition to several colleagues, or indeed to provide information to concerned parents, this is easily achieved.

Further details of the volumes and their contents are to be found on www.behaviourmatters.com/syndromesoffer.

Cost of the 3 volumes is £60 (a saving of £15 on normal price) plus £6 postage and packaging.

To order please visit www.behaviourmatters.com/syndromesoffer or contact us at:

Behaviour Solutions Limited

15 St. Marys Close

Abbotskerswell

Newton Abbot

Devon

TQ12 5QF

Phone / Fax 01626 366161

Email: dave@behaviourmatters.com

The Little Box of BIG Questions

Philosophical and meaningful conversations with children and young people

Professor Irvine Gersch & Dr Anna Lipscomb

Children/young people need time, space and kindness to speak openly about the things most important to them and listening can help facilitators understand better the root of children’s thinking and behaviour, and can give an insight into how to better support them to reach their potential. Use these cards to provide prompts for a meaningful, stimulating and positive conversation about the ‘bigger picture’ in life. They will help children and young people understand their views about life, school and people important to them, which is enlightening for the facilitators too.

There are four areas for discussion:

Identity – allows the child to consider what is special about them as individuals & includes: How would you describe the person you are?

Important people – children are encouraged to consider who is important to them through questions such as: Who is special to you?

Meaning & Purpose – questions covering our mission and purpose in life, for example: Do you think that people’s lives are set out for them?

Thinking & Planning – the final set of questions allows individuals to think about how they reflect and make big decisions, for instance: How do you calm your mind, relax and think best? Have you ever experienced a big change in your life?

Contents: 17 A5-size cards, includes instruction booklet with ideas for use

LITTLE BOX OF BIG QUESTIONS ref. 400H £24.99

TO ORDER:
Post: Small World, 9 Burnham Place, Syresham, Northants, NN13 5HT
Tel: 01280 850 305
Fax: 01280 830022

Email: orders@smlworld.co.uk
http://www.smlworld.co.uk/little-box-of-big-questions-order-form-hh.html

To obtain a 5% discount on your order, please quote HH14 on your purchase order form or add the discount code whilst purchasing online.

 

A cumulative approach to developing handwriting skills

The cause of underdeveloped handwriting in some pupils is not always immediately apparent. It could be that these pupils have poor fine motor skills, language processing, or visual perceptual skills, or perhaps it is attributable to the way that they grip their pen/pencil or to their handwriting posture.

In many instances, however, the reason for underdeveloped handwriting is because the approach that they are using isn’t cumulative, which is key to ensuring progress in the development of handwriting skills.

It is for this reason that we have produced The Handwriting Rescue Scheme – a complete programme for fully cursive handwriting containing over 300 structured exercises. It has been designed to establish the correct cursive letter formation and encourage an automatic response to frequently used spelling choices.

The programme is ideal for introducing cursive handwriting and also for correcting poor handwriting habits among pupils whose handwriting isn’t up to the expected standard for their age.

You can order the Handwriting Rescue Scheme in any of these ways:

How to make teachers twice as effective in the classroom and double the attainment of lower ability students

How to make teachers twice as effective in the classroom and double the attainment of lower ability students

This statement is bold but true, latest research shows that when carefully crafted seating charts are in place, teachers are twice as effective in the classroom and the attainment of lower ability students can be doubled.

This will come as no surprise to those more experienced teaching staff. By telling pupils where they should sit in the classroom you are immediately asserting your authority and can also take advantage of strategies such as peer to peer learning.

So does your school have a policy on seating charts? Are you able to ascertain which combinations work best for the classroom and lead to improved performance and behaviour, are you ready to impress Ofsted?

Class Charts links up with SIMS, Integris & SMIS. It instantly creates seating charts for your teachers and displays key data such as SEN, Pupil Premium & subject targets. This means that your staff will be aware of pupils’ abilities and needs at a glance.

But there is more!

Coupled with the seating charts is an optional real time behaviour management system (SIMS writeback supported) that is simple for your staff to use and provides the leadership team with detailed behaviour analytics – allowing them to pinpoint behaviour issues and trends and get support strategies in place.

Sound good?

Take a look at what is on offer at Class Charts and get in touch quoting ref HH for a chat or a quick online demo.

support@classcharts.com

0845 094 6427

Edukey Education Ltd, 1 High Street, St Davids, SA62 6SA

How to make teachers twice as effective in the classroom and double the attainment of lower ability students

This statement is bold but true, latest research shows that when carefully crafted seating charts are in place, teachers are twice as effective in the classroom and the attainment of lower ability students can be doubled.

This will come as no surprise to those more experienced teaching staff. By telling pupils where they should sit in the classroom you are immediately asserting your authority and can also take advantage of strategies such as peer to peer learning.

So does your school have a policy on seating charts? Are you able to ascertain which combinations work best for the classroom and lead to improved performance and behaviour, are you ready to impress Ofsted?

Class Charts links up with SIMS, Integris & SMIS. It instantly creates seating charts for your teachers and displays key data such as SEN, Pupil Premium & subject targets. This means that your staff will be aware of pupils’ abilities and needs at a glance.

But there is more!

Coupled with the seating charts is an optional real time behaviour management system (SIMS writeback supported) that is simple for your staff to use and provides the leadership team with detailed behaviour analytics – allowing them to pinpoint behaviour issues and trends and get support strategies in place.

Sound good?

Take a look at what is on offer at Class Charts and get in touch quoting ref HH for a chat or a quick online demo.

support@classcharts.com

0845 094 6427

Edukey Education Ltd, 1 High Street, St Davids, SA62 6SA

Ofsted is again highlighting low-level disruption. But it is still missing the fundamental question.

Ofsted’s 2014 pronouncement (“Below the radar”) about low-level disruption was remarkably similar to its earlier comments on the subject.

Indeed it has been commenting on the topic since at least 2005 – and quite possibly before.

And what is interesting is that once again there was one issue missing: the discussion on why low-level disruption happens. What is the cause?

This is not a remote academic question, because normally understanding the cause of a problem is the key to solving the problem. In this case, however, it seems Ofsted thinks not.

The government office instead focusses on the notion that some teachers feel senior leaders do not understand what behaviour is really like in the classroom – and they cite PISA research which backs up this view.

In most organisations, if a problem exists and is not being solved, the issue of the cause quickly becomes the focal point. Find out why and then address the issue.

Indeed it can be argued that one of the great problems with approaches to discipline is that they are based on ideas and beliefs rather than practical experimentation which might establish whether a theory works in terms of reducing disruption and enhancing learning.

Even when such experimentation does exist, it can sometimes be the case that those who determine educational policy may set it aside when the experiment’s results don’t quite match their established political beliefs.

When it comes to behaviour and discipline there is research, the findings of which have never been countered, which shows that the key factor in determining the behaviour of pupils is not the syllabus of the school, parental expectations, nor indeed the socio-economic background of the students.

Rather it is the view of the staff within the school. In fact, where different staff hold different views on the issue of behaviour and discipline, then behavioural issues increase.

In short, when the staff genuinely agree to, and subsequently adopt, a unified policy then the problems vanish.

What makes this finding so important is that first, it puts the power to change pupil and student behaviour totally in the hands of the school and its managers, and second, it assures us all that change is possible.

This is the starting point for the volume, Improving attitudes, managing behaviour and reducing exclusions, a book that builds from the original research which proved this finding and which applies it to contemporary schooling.

The findings of the original research reviewed in the book are very clear: schools improve when all those in the school decide to improve the school, not because of government initiatives, Ofsted, or what anyone else tells us to do.

For, once a school has its own unified policy, and is able to project that policy to parents and students as an approach to which all staff agree, the unity of purpose of the school is established.

The key issue thus becomes the implementation and maintenance of the policy every day of the school year. And it is the implementation of this approach that “Improving attitudes” describes.

You can see some sample pages at http://pdf.firstandbest.co.uk/education/T1813.pdf

Publisher’s reference: T1813EMN ISBN: 978 1 86083 821 7

Prices

  • Photocopiable book £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • CD £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • Book plus CD £31.94 plus £3.95 delivery

Prices include VAT.

You can purchase the report… please quote the order ref: T1813EMN

“Learning outside the classroom is a great way of helping pupils with SEN to reach their potential, and Ofsted are rather keen on it too”

Elaine Skates, Deputy Chief Executive of the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom

SEN Magazine reports on the results of a survey, conducted by TeacherVoice on behalf of the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom, revealing that 70% of teachers value LOtC over classroom teaching in terms of how effective it is at engaging different learning styles.

The article, entitled ‘Outside intervention’, reports that children with SEN typically learn best through doing, also known as kinaesthetic learning. However, this preferred learning style can sometimes be difficult to undertake effectively in the classroom.

It also highlights that in the school grounds and beyond there are more opportunities for pupils to undertake sensory learning which enables them to see, hear, smell, touch, and ultimately explore the world – encouraging pupils with SEN to “expand their horizons and become more alert and aware of the world around them.”

However learning outside the classroom doesn’t just support pupils in reaching their academic potential, but also support pupils with their personal development, particularly in terms of their confidence levels and communication skills.

Further to this, SEN Magazine states that LOtC is “relevant to demonstrating good/outstanding practice across all four areas of the Ofsted inspection framework”. However, evidence must be collected of such learning to achieve this, such as:

Attainment and achievement – examples of where LOtC can be directly linked to improved attainment.

Quality of teaching – proof that LOtC is well-planned and integrated into the curriculum with the aim of extending the knowledge, skills and understanding of pupils with different learning needs and abilities.

Behaviour and motivation – examples of how different learning environments increase your pupils’ motivation and encourage positive behaviours. It could be argued that LOtC promotes learning that improves pupils’ safety as they’re encouraged to manage risks themselves.

Leadership and management – clear documentation, including: LOtC in the school policy, LOtC evaluation (how has LOtC improved the quality of teaching and learning at the school?), and a development plan (how can LOtC be improve for the future?).

To get notifications of learning-outside-the-classroom activity and location ideas and more on information on how LOtC can be used to benefit your pupils’ learning and development, follow us on Twitter @MinibusLeasing or like our Facebook page – Benchmark Minibus.

For more information about Benchmark Leasing you can go to our website, call us on 01753 859944, or email minibus@benchmarkleasing.co.uk.

Link to article: https://senmagazine.co.uk/articles/articles/senarticles/outside-intervention-heling-pupils-wuth-sen-reach-their-potential-by-learning-outside-the-classroom 

Sex doesn’t change; it is the attitude of young people to sex that changes and that’s the problem

In debating sex and sexuality there are two issues: context and expectation.

Nudity and sex have different meanings in different contexts and as expectation changes following the growth of unbridled pornography available to anyone who seeks it on the internet.

So we may ask, in this era of dramatic change, amidst a million contexts and varying expectations, what determines the appropriateness or otherwise of any picture or behaviour? What makes some contexts more or less appropriate than others?

Considering this topic helps to lead us towards the most effective ways of dealing with sex education – for it suggests that by focussing on a very specific topic or issue it is possible to lead into much more productive and insightful discussion and reflection than through the use of less focussed activity.

Thus in the chapter “Nudity and the Media” in the copiable volume “Sex and Sensibility”, the sex and relationships course for secondary schools, we consider the issue of the cover of a parenting magazine which showed a mother breast feeding a child – a picture which itself brought outrage and opprobrium. Context and expectation appears to be everything.

This is one of 60 such topics gathered together in 12 modules, ranging from the opening section on “Being human” through to modules on “The Right Pace”, “Peer Pressure”, “Sexual Orientation”, “Sex and Language” and “Sex in the Media”.

Each topic contains a whole series of activities for the students to participate in, which can be used as either whole class or small group discussion topics, as research topics and for written assignments.

Each area within the volume is itself used to explore wider connotations – and thus includes such areas as following fashion, one’s own look, influences, being oneself, how we see ourselves and so forth.

There are around 100 pages of activities and materials for the students, as well as over 20 pages of teaching notes and further information.

Sample pages can be viewed at http://www.pdf.firstandbest.co.uk/pshe/T1760.pdf

Publisher’s reference: T1760EMN      ISBN: 978 1 86083 754 8

Prices

  • Photocopiable report: £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • CD with school-wide rights: £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • Both the Ring Binder and the CD £31.94 plus £3.95 delivery
  • Prices include VAT.

You can purchase the report… please quote the order ref: T1760emn

Free Schools Solar Panels

Our ingenious renewable schools solar programme returns; for another two months . . . giving you a last chance to make immediate savings on your electricity without any costs to the school for the panels.

 Join us. https://www.engynious.com/en/ukschools/schoolssolarprogramme/howtojoin/

If you want to have immediate savings on your electricity costs, get renewable power but have no money, act now to secure:

·      Free PV panels

·      Free maintenance

·      Free education

·      Save money from day one by buying low cost renewable power

Join our existing schools network and register today. Over 60 schools have joined us; about 50 have systems from 20kWp to 200kWp.  Find out how you can save on your energy bills.

Our schools say:

“When we first saw the offer we thought it was too good to be true; install free, panels free, upkeep free.  But it’s true . . .”
Oasis Shirley Park – 50kWp

 “We are delighted to have the teaching resource and of course cheap electricity without the worries of capital and maintenance costs.”
                                                  West Park School – 50kWp plus another 100kWp

“The most professional and technically knowledgeable of everyone we have met. That is reassuring when you are about to get solar PV.”
Kingshott School – 30kWp

Our schools enjoy access to cheap power without any risks or responsibilities now or in the future. They see savings from day one.  Don’t miss this opportunity . . . . it will disappear very quickly.

Best wishes

Engynious SEEd Solar Team

07946 245 556

Government warning: Our offer is subject to changes in government support and that change is imminent.  We believe we may have two more months for this offer. Next time, our offer will not give you immediate savings; you will still be able to have panels for free but you will have to buy renewable power at price parity with mains supplies! If you want to see immediate savings on electricity costs join us without delay.

Dyscalculia is one of the more problematic of special needs. So how can we best understand it?

It has taken a long time for dyscalculia to become recognised as a significant special need that should be considered as a possibility whenever a pupil or student is thought to be performing in maths at a level considerably below that which might otherwise be expected.

The growing understanding of dyscalculia has been hampered by an occasional lack of awareness of the varied ways in which dyscalculia can express itself within a pupil or student’s behaviour.

This is rather different from dyslexia where a recognition of the genetic disorder can on occasion be more readily spotted.

The specific problem with dyscalculia originates in the nature of maths itself.  Maths is, of course, the ultimate logical subject, with each element building on what has gone before.

At its simplest, if a child fails to grasp (for example) the essence of addition, then it is unlikely that the child will make much sense of multiplication. A child who doesn’t grasp division will have a hard time with fractions, and so on.

As a result of this, a pupil or student who fails to make progress in school in maths might not be making the progress because he/she has dyscalculia, but also might not be making progress because the child was absent for a prolonged period during the teaching of specific concepts in maths and has never had a chance to catch up.

Such an issue can be complicated by the attitude towards maths of the child’s parents. If the parents find maths hard going, or worse, if one of the parents takes the view that, “I was never any good at maths and it never harmed me” (or the variant – “what do you need maths for – you’ve got a computer haven’t you?”), then the child also starts to turn against maths and fails to apply him/herself.

But this is only the start of the problems with dyscalculia, because it turns out that issues such as problems with the transference between the short and long term memory can also cause dyscalculia-like difficulties.

In a recent article Tony Attwood, head of the Dyscalculia Centre which has undertaken diagnostic tests on over 1000 pupils and students suspected of carrying the gene variant that causes dyscalculia, outlined five different formulations of dyscalculia.

This article which originally appeared in SEN Magazine has now been updated and re-published on the Centre’s website here. It gives a clear indication of what the five types of dyscalculia are, and how they can be readily identified.

How to develop positive behaviour and erase bullying at playtimes and lunchtimes

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development happens all the time. In the class, in the playground, in the home.

The problem is that when left to their own devices during playtimes and lunchtimes, some of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development that one sees is not necessarily what one wants to see.

In short, while some children will play in a very positive way, some use playtime and lunchtime to learn how to be bullies.  And sadly, because they find they like the feelings they get from bullying, they continue to do it.

Thus while others work together, mutually acknowledging the rules of their own games, helping and supporting each other and gaining much from the experience, for others the learning that happens is exactly what we don’t want to happen.

A straightforward way to enhance positive play in the school grounds is to teach the children one game a week which they can then work on together.  Some games will catch on and become continuing favourites. Others by the nature of things will fade after a few days.

If the games can then be revealed to parents either by being put on the school’s website, or with the details described on the website or in hand outs, the impact of the game can be extended further and further.

The initial playing of the playground game by a group of children is always a highly rewarding experience. The sorting out of the rules, agreeing the fundamentals and, above all, working together are all basic to the development of the social aspect of each child’s life.

What’s more, many children will become enthused by the game, leaving those on duty with a much smaller number of potentially problematic situations to deal with.

PSHE in the Playground is a photocopiable book (also available on CD so that it can be loaded onto the school’s network) which incorporates enough games to last a full school year and includes games that are suitable for both key stage 1 and key stage 2 children.  Most games can be taught to children in a matter of minutes.

Because the book is copiable only one copy needs to be purchased for the book to be used by all teachers in the school throughout the year.

An extract from PSHE in the Playground, ISBN 978 1 86083 726 5, order code T1691EMN is available at http://www.pdf.firstandbest.co.uk/primary/T1691.pdf

Prices

  • Photocopiable report in a ring binder, £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • CD with school-wide rights: £24.95 plus £3.95 delivery
  • Both the Ring Binder and the CD £31.94 plus £3.95 delivery
  • Prices include VAT.

You can purchase the report…

When ordering the book please quote the reference T1791EMN.

 

Autism Spectrum – Next Steps (Level 3) Accredited At Level 3 through The Open College Network

Autism Spectrum – Next Steps (Level 3)
Accredited At Level 3 through The Open College Network
Why accreditation?
Although we appreciate that it is important to gain recognition of training from a nationally recognised accreditation body, our accredited courses are not just about “ticking boxes”. Our accredited courses are practical, using real life case studies and they give positive, practical strategies for immediate use.

The accreditation doesn’t require post-course study or the creation of portfolios as all evaluation is carried out by the tutor throughout the day. This means that anyone successfully completing the programme will gain the accreditation.

Who is this course suitable for?
Anyone who has completed the Concept Training “Autism Spectrum – An Introduction (Level 2)” or equivalent introductory training or who has “hands-on” experience in working with people on the autism spectrum.

What prior knowledge or experience is needed?
As above.

Summary of the course
An Intermediate Open College Network Level 3 course for anyone supporting children, young people or adults on the autism spectrum.

Course contents
The autism spectrum – myths and facts
Understand the function of certain behaviours
The triad of impairment as a profiling tool
The diagnostic criteria
Language support strategies
Developing social skills
Inflexibility of thought and ways to help
Reviewing the environment
Course ref: OCN3-GB6-124

Price:

Venues excluding London: £245+VAT for the 1st place,
£225+VAT for 2nd and subsequent places on the same course.

London Venues: £270+VAT for the 1st place, £250+VAT for
2nd and subsequent places on the same course.

Course cost includes lunch, refreshments, certificate and supporting notes.

Course times 9:30 am – 3:30 pm

We can come to you! This course can also be delivered IN HOUSE.
“Sally is a very inspirational speaker who held my full
attention throughout. Her passion for her work and her
empathy & understanding of the problems facing
children on the autism spectrum and their
parents/carers/teachers was fantastic. Her humour
and ability to relate the topics discussed to her own
experience made for an informative and very
interesting course and I feel that I have learned loads.”

Bernadette Fahy, Children’s OT

Course Location
Course Dates
Glasgow, Adelphi Centre
25/11/2015
Chorley, Woodlands
Conference Centre
05/02/2016
London, The Ibis Hotel,
Euston Station
03/03/2016

15/06/2016
To receive a 25% discount (for any of our courses) please quote HH when
booking by phone and booking online
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Severe behaviour problems

What is the most effective way of dealing with acute and severe behaviour problems?

One-off high-level incidents may occur very infrequently in your school, but as and when they do, their consequences can be considerable.

In the worst case scenarios such events can be deeply disturbing to any teacher involved, causing significant mental strain resulting in even the most experienced teacher questioning his/her own professional competence.

Additionally these are the incidents that can lead to a high risk of damage to property and also a risk to personal safety.

Indeed although few teachers raise the issue, school managers and governors do have a legal duty to provide their staff with working conditions that are safe, and therefore the school does need to show that it has taken all reasonable steps to ensure this is so.

It is to help with this essential work that we have produced the Acute & Severe Behaviour Problems DVD by Dave Stott.

This DVD deals with acute behaviour situations, and explores effective systems for gaining help, and protecting teachers from physical and psychological attack.

It also considers the effects on both the individual pupil and the whole group and, specifically, on the teacher, including emotional upset, interruptions to learning, and the resultant anger and frustration.

Additionally the DVD highlights early warning signs, disruptive ‘off-task’ behaviour, physical threats, arguments, anger and violence, direct verbal threats, damage to property, defiance and refusal to apply instruction and leaving the teaching area without permission.

The DVD is packed with specific help, advice and guidance for teachers and incorporates a large number of practical scenarios and is available for school wide use for £55.00 + VAT.

You can place an order by..

Please quote the order code 007HH  when ordering.  

A handbook for preventing Radicalisation and Terrorism

Your students may well know what terrorists do,
but do they know why they do it?

Anyone with access to a media outlet will know that the UK has a fundamental problem with its teenagers and young adults becoming radicalised by the various terrorist groups acting against the ways of the western world.

So much has this radicalisation of our young become a problem in recent years that, as part of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act, schools must now implement anti-radicalisation measures to help prevent young people from being drawn into terrorism.

However, there is a problem with this, which John Horgan of Georgia State University and author of The Psychology of Terrorism expresses:

“At a time when teachers are expected to do their part in preventing and reporting radicalization in their communities, there are virtually no resources to help understand and teach the complexity of terrorism in a way that is objective, balanced and accessible.”

In response to this, Alison Jamieson and Jane Flint have produced a masterful handbook which provides teachers with the means to support their pupils in recognising, debating, and disrupting extremist narratives within the context of the classroom.

Radicalisation and Terrorism is a reliable and objective resource that covers issues of citizenship, human rights and respect, civil and political engagement, the nature of identity, and how we identify with others.

It examines different forms of violence from bullying to the most recent examples of 21st century terrorism and explores what terrorists do and why they do it; how to differentiate between the reasons, goals and methods of terrorists; why the media and terrorism are inextricably linked; what makes terrorism start and what factors bring terrorism to an end.

You can order the Radicalisation and Terrorism resource in any of these ways:

  • On our website
  • By phone on 01449 766629
  • By fax on 01449 768047
  • By email to orders@tradecounter.co.uk
  • Or By post to Brilliant Publications, Mendlesham Industrial Estate, Norwich Road, Mendlesham, Suffolk, IP14 5ND.

Brilliant Publications,
Mendlesham Industrial Estate,
Norwich Road,
Mendlesham,
Suffolk,
IP14 5ND.

website: www.brilliantpublications.co.uk
email: orders@tradecounter.co.uk

phone: 01449 766629
fax: 01449 768047